Preventive Care

Topics on this page

Regular Exams and Cleanings | Mouthguards | Nightguards | Sealants

Preventive dental care is worthwhile throughout your life, no matter what your age is. By practicing good oral hygiene at home and scheduling regular checkups with our office, you can keep your smile bright and healthy for many years to come.

Here are a few simple ways to prevent the build-up of plaque and cavities:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush. Use fluoride toothpaste to remove food particles and plaque from the tooth surfaces. Also, make sure to brush the top surface of your tongue; this will remove any extra plaque-causing food particles, and help keep your breath fresh!
  • Clean between your teeth by flossing at least once a day. You can also use a mouthwash to help kill bacteria and freshen your breath. Decay-causing bacteria can linger between your teeth where toothbrush bristles can’t reach. Floss and mouthwash will help remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.

    Printable instructions >

     

    Brushing instructions
    • brushing diagram

      Brushing: Step 1

      Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to your gum.

    • brushing diagram

      Brushing: Step 2

      Brush gently in a circular motion.

    • brushing diagram

      Brushing: Step 3

      Brush the outer, inner, and chewing surfaces of each tooth.

    • brushing diagram

      Brushing: Step 4

      Use the tip of your brush for the inner surface of your front teeth.

     

    Flossing instructions
    • flossing diagram

      Flossing: Step 1

      Wind about 18 inches of floss around your fingers as shown. Most of it should be wrapped around one finger, and the other finger takes it up as the floss is used.

    • flossing diagram

      Flossing: Step 2

      Use your thumbs and forefingers to guide about one inch of floss between your teeth.

    • flossing diagram

      Flossing: Step 3

      Holding the floss tightly, gently saw it between your teeth. Then curve the floss into a C-shape against one tooth and gently slide it beneath your gums.

    • flossing diagram

      Flossing: Step 4

      Slide the floss up and down, and repeat for each tooth.

     

  • Eat a balanced diet, and try to avoid extra-sugary treats. Nutritious foods such as raw vegetables, plain yogurt, cheese, or fruit can help keep your smile healthy.
  • Remember to schedule regular checkups with our office every six months for a professional teeth cleaning.
  • Ask us about dental sealants: protective plastic coatings that can be applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay often starts.
  • If you play sports, be sure to ask our team about special mouthguards designed to protect your smile.

If it’s been six months since your last dental checkup, then it’s time to contact our practice and schedule your next appointment!


exams and cleanings

Regular Exams and Cleanings

Regular exams are an important part of maintaining your oral health. During your regular exam, we will:

  • Check for any problems you may not see or feel
  • Look for cavities or other signs of tooth decay
  • Inspect your teeth and gums for gingivitis and signs of periodontal disease
  • Perform a thorough teeth cleaning

Your regular exam will take about 45 minutes. Each regular exam includes a detailed teeth cleaning, during which we will clean, polish, and rinse your teeth to remove any tartar and plaque that have built up on the tooth’s surface.

Visiting our office every six months gives you the chance to ask Dr. Thomas Han or Dr. Sam Han any questions you may have about your oral health. Regular exams are offered by appointment only, so please contact our practice today to schedule your next dental exam and teeth cleaning.

↑ Back to top


Mouthguards

mouthguardWhether you wear braces or not, protecting your smile while playing sports is essential. Mouthguards help protect your teeth and gums from injury. If you participate in any kind of full-contact sport, the American Dental Association recommends that you wear a mouthguard.

Choosing the right mouthguard is essential. There are three basic types of mouthguards: the pre-made mouthguard, the “boil-and-bite” fitted mouthguard, and a custom-made mouthguard from a dentist.

When you choose a mouthguard, be sure to pick one that is tear-resistant, comfortable and well-fitted for your mouth, easy to keep clean, and does not prevent you from breathing properly. We can show you how to wear a mouthguard properly and how to choose the right one to protect your smile.

↑ Back to top


Nightguards

nightguardIf you often wake up with jaw pain, earaches, or headaches, or find yourself clenching or grinding your teeth, you may have a common condition called “bruxism.” Many people do not even know that they grind their teeth, because it often occurs during sleep. If not corrected, bruxism can lead to broken teeth, cracked teeth, or even tooth loss.

There is an easy, non-invasive treatment for bruxism. Nightguards are an easy way to prevent the wear and damage that teeth grinding causes over time. Custom-made by our office from soft material to fit your teeth, a nightguard is inserted over your top or bottom arch and prevents contact with the opposing teeth.

↑ Back to top


Sealants

sealantsSometimes brushing is not enough, especially when it comes to those hard-to-reach spots in your mouth. It is difficult for your toothbrush to get between the small cracks and grooves on your teeth. If left alone, those tiny areas can develop tooth decay. Sealants give your teeth extra protection against decay and help prevent cavities.

Dental sealants are plastic resins that bond and harden in the deep grooves on your tooth’s surface. When a tooth is sealed, the tiny grooves become smooth and are less likely to harbor plaque. With sealants, brushing your teeth becomes easier and more effective against tooth decay.

Sealants are typically applied to children’s teeth as a preventive measure against tooth decay after the permanent teeth have erupted. However, adults can also receive sealants on healthy teeth. It is more common to seal “permanent” teeth rather than “baby” teeth, but every patient has unique needs, and we will recommend sealants on a case-by-case basis.

Sealants last from three to five years, but it is fairly common to see adults with sealants still intact from their childhood. A dental sealant only provides protection when it is fully intact, so if your sealants come off, let us know, and schedule an appointment for your teeth to be re-sealed.

↑ Back to top


Fluoride

flouride

Fluoride is effective in preventing cavities and tooth decay as well as in preventing plaque from building up and hardening on the tooth’s surface. A fluoride treatment in our office takes just a few minutes. After the treatment, you may be asked not to rinse, eat, or drink for at least 30 minutes in order to allow the teeth to absorb the fluoride.

Depending on your oral health or the doctor’s recommendation, you may be required to have a fluoride treatment every three, six, or 12 months.

↑ Back to top

 

<